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Shhhhhh! The Secret World of Medical Aesthetics

Posted on 19 November, 2010

LPA recently carried out a survey on clients to find out attitudes towards sharing the amazing secrets of using wrinkle reduction injections. The survey asked:   It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, your best friend says 'You look good, what have you done?' Do you say that you have had 'Botox'?

Response

62.5% Yes

37.5% No  

It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, someone at work says 'You look good, what have you done?' Do you tell him / her you had 'Botox'?

Response

37.5% Yes

62.5% No  

It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, your best friend asks 'Have you had 'Botox?' What do you say?

Response

85.7% Yes

14.3% No  

It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, someone at work asks 'Have you had 'Botox?' What do you say?

Response

37.5% Yes

62.5% No  

It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, your best friend doesn't know and asks 'Would you ever think about having 'Botox?' What do you say?

Response

87.5% Yes

12.5% No  

It's been 2 weeks since you had your wrinkle reduction injections, someone at work (who doesn't know you have had treatment) asks 'Would you ever think about having 'Botox?' What do you say?

Response

85.7%  Yes

14.3%  No  

In summary it seems that whilst we are more willing to share our ‘Botox’ secrets with our best friends, we are not ready to be completely open even with them and we certainly don’t want to discuss this with whom we are less familiar. So why do we feels so coy about our medical aesthetic treatments? Some would say that the use of ‘Botox’ is vanity gone too far. But who judges what is going too far and why? Is it OK to wear makeup? Is it OK to style and colour your hair? Is it OK to buy pants that suck you in or chicken fillets that fill you out? What about all that money that we spend in the gym & using personal trainers? Are these not all commonly accepted acts of vanity?

Could it be that it has less to do with the desire to resist vanity and more to do with a pressure to look good ‘naturally’. So many times we read about celebrities who have less meat on them than a celery stick yet who claim to take no exercise and eat what they like. However when we see photos of them taken pre fame they have a more ‘natural’ body shape. These people clearly do watch what they eat, in fact some must live on severely restricted diets and / or exercise regimes that do not allow for a ‘day off’.

So why the pretence? It seems we all feel the pressure to have perfect genes. So the good news is (for those that haven’t yet discovered for themselves) that when compared with hair and makeup treatments, the use of medical aesthetics (if carried out well) is much less obvious. Most of the time people instantly recognize when you have a new haircut or a new shade of lipstick but are much less able to tell when you have had wrinkle reduction injections or dermal fillers.

Clients often say that friends and family will simply comment on how good they look following  a treatment but are unable to pinpoint what it is that is different. Herein lies the temptation to respond ‘oh thanks it’s my new moisturizer / good night’s sleep / new zest for life!’. You choose your response; nobody needs to know…..we can keep the secret just between us!